Mr. C Hotels sailing into NYC’s Seaport

by —Stefani C. O’Connor – Hotelbusiness.com [ view source ]

NEW YORK—Well known in sophisticated circles in Beverly Hills, the independent Mr. C Hotels will be bringing its luxury brand to the East Coast later this year, opening its second hotel at the South Street Seaport in Lower Manhattan, adjacent the Financial District.

Bob and Alex Ghassemieh, the developers behind the West Coast hotel, are reprising their role with the Seaport property, which is owned by affiliates of the Los Angeles hotel. And as at the Los Angeles hotel, Mr. C Seaport will be operated by the internationally known Cipriani family, who opened the legendary Harry’s Bar in Venice, Italy, in 1931.

Stepping in to wrangle the 66-room hotel are fourth-generation Cipriani brothers, Maggio and Ignazio, millennials who founded Mr. C Hotels in 2011 and are now helping run the family business.

Located at the corner of Front St. and Peck Slip, Mr. C Seaport will occupy the site once held by the Best Western Seaport Inn. The hotel was bought in early 2016 for $38.3 million by The Howard Hughes Corp., which currently is transforming the 11-block Seaport District via a $1.5-billion redevelopment project that also includes reinventing the Seaport’s iconic Pier 17, the landmarked Tin Building and the Fulton Market Building.

According to Maggio Cipriani, the family enterprise has been on the lookout “for quite some time” for the right property in New York, and a few different sites were offered for the family to consider.

“When we came along this building, the combination of a charming unique area close to the waterfront, the exciting redevelopment in the works by The Howard Hughes Corp. and interesting historic architecture all contributed to make the Seaport project the perfect choice,” he said.

“New York is one of the top destinations for leisure and business travel so it seemed quite natural to extend the Mr. C brand to the city, where our family has already a large presence with different projects,” said Ignazio Cipriani, alluding to such holdings as its venues at 55 Wall St., 25 Broadway and 110 East 42 St., restaurants and residences. “With our first L.A. location we have become the home away from home for many travelers from Europe, the States and around the world, and we are confident that old and new customers will appreciate this comfortable and timeless concept coming to New York.”

The Seaport District itself seems somewhat timeless. With roots going back to 1625, the area is the site of some of Manhattan’s oldest architecture. The hotel site itself, at 33 Peck Slip, is historic. Developer Bob Ghassemieh noted the five-story, red-brick building’s exterior is landmarked, and it has two stories of recessed guestrooms with balconies. “We have been committed to preserve it during the renovation process and worked together with the Landmark Commission,” he said.

Danish architect Thomas Juul-Hansen is leading the hotel’s design, said to be a mix of “European glamour and nautical expressions,” and the building is undergoing an interior reconstruction.

Rooms, including 10 premium suites with terraces, will be equipped with teak veneer, rain showers, 50-in. interactive televisions and Italian linens. In addition, a lobby lounge will feature drinks and afternoon tea, and a signature dining experience. Private function space and fitness facilities also will be available.

In how the property will reflect a “sense of place,” Ignazio Cipriani noted the Mr. C brand is about “an understated and comfortable elegance, and a design that is timeless and reminiscent of an Old World simplicity. In this specific project, the proximity to the waterfront, the feel of the neighborhood with its cobblestone streets and the memory of an active maritime and commercial hub, lead to many nautical elements in the decor, the colors and the materials. High-polished teak, white leather, stainless steel and warm velvet characterize the interiors with all the furniture being custom made in Italy by Tedeschi USA.”

While The Howard Hughes Corp.’s vision for the area has changed and been somewhat scaled back since it first started implementing its plans for the District several years ago, the current plans still call for creating more than 400,000 sq. ft. of culinary, cultural, entertainment and fashion offerings. Some of these include Italian fashion store 10 Corso Como; a 50,000-sq.-ft. food market by Jean-Georges Vongerichten in the restored Tin Building; and an iPic Theater, which opened last year. Pier 17 will feature a 1.5-acre rooftop that will include a restaurant, outdoor bars and a venue for special events.

With all the activity in the area, Maggio Cipriani expressed confidence that the timing was right on the Mr. C Seaport project, noting, “The addition of this hospitality piece could not happen at a better time.”

Ignazio Cipriani added the hotel is on schedule to open at the end of this year. “Yes, as of now, we are respecting our deadlines,” he said, hinting more Mr. C’s would follow the Manhattan hotel’s debut.

“We are already exploring different locations in gateway cities in the United States, Europe and the Middle East,” said Maggio Cipriani. “We really think that it is a unique, independent concept that should appeal to a variety of confident travelers who are looking to spend some quality time in beautiful, comfortable surroundings, receive excellent service and take full advantage of the vibrant neighborhood and the great views.”

 

 

IT-PLACES! – Cipriani Mexico

by por CINTYA VILLAMAR [ view source ]

Entiéndase como ‘los lugares’ —ni más, ni menos— que tienes que visitar. Bienvenidos al Cipriani y Bellinghausen, dos restaurantes que a partir de hoy, forman parte de tu estilo de vida sibarita.

 

 

The Top 23 Rooftop Bars Around the World : New York: Bar Hugo

by BarChick.com [ view source ]

With floor-to-ceiling windows, a wood decked terrace looking over the Hudson, cool art, great tunes, and cocktails by Brit Ben Scorah of Bill’s Food and Drink, this duplex bar is ticking a lot of boxes. Toast the town with a Light and Breezy cocktail of Elyx Absolut Vodka, lime and ginger beer, or hit up the top floor for the boozy brunch on weekends

 

 

Hugo Hotel: a boutique hotel in Hudson Square, SoHo New York City

by ArchiJuice.com [ view source ]

The new Bar Hugo – again by Marcello Pozzi – affords a breathtaking 360° vista over the Hudson River, Lower Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty, and it’s a place you’d never wish to leave.

A triumph of elegance, with luxury furniture custom-made by Tedeschi, clusters of hand-blown lighting by Bocci and Brazilian walnut floorboards, all in a crescendo of sophistication starting from the hotel and reaching to the very top of the building, at the Bar Hugo.

The Hugo is a boutique hotel opened last February in New York, in centrally-located Hudson Square, round the corner from Soho and the West Village, now a signature cultural destination.

The hotel has been designed by Marcello Pozzi, Italian-born and with a career spanning Busto Arsizio [in Lombardy] to Beverly Hills, and features 122 rooms and two suites, plus conference facilities, a fitness area, an Italian restaurant and a spectacular top-floor lounge with a 360° view over the city.

Pozzi was inspired by the XXth century architecture of avant-garde New York, a magnet for artists and global travelers, and the Hugo aspires to a front-rank spot among the New York hospitality icons, thanks to its high-end yet low-key approach.

The architectural contrast between original, industrial-era features, such as bare concrete and the color of window fixtures, and the sophisticated, elegant interior details, create an atmosphere of affluent, exclusive practicality.

The entrance hall leads to the main lobby and features a marble floor and navy travertine walls. As you make your way inside, the Hugo’s ‘metro urban’ nature gently starts to bite: there are powerful green elements everywhere, especially behind the reception desk, where their impact is highly aggressive.

High ceilings, wide open spaces and curved walnut-paneled walls alternate with concrete, while Pozzi-designed small leather sofas follow the pattern of the lobby’s horizontal lines.

The Hugo’s vertical vegetation (over 3,000 plants) is alive. It’s been created by G SKY using a brilliant, patented, advanced irrigation system.

The sash windows are the connection between new deal- Soho and the future.

For the bespoke furniture Marcello Pozzi has chosen a sophisticated Italian craftsman: the Tedeschi company, with an office in New York and a remarkable honors list, including work for all the world’s top hotel chains.

For the Hugo Hotel, Tedeschi has produced all of the lobby’s walnut wood structures, all the rooms and suites, the Pozzi-designed sofas and above all – a real gem – the restaurant’s benches, horizontal polished walnut planks which lend the ambience the unforgettable feeling of an early XXth century railway station waiting-room.

The lighting design project has been curated by the Lighting Design Studio principal, John Decker, while the lighting fixtures are by Visual Comfort, except for the floor lamps which are by Restoration Hardware, the well-known US contractor that has also supplied the Egg Chair located in the central lobby.

Texan designer Sutherland has provided the creative, white cement coffee-tables in the lobby.

The layered coffee-tables come from ISF’s Stack collection, designed by Pozzi.

The Hugo Hotel is a treasure chest awaiting discovery, a design project which incorporates and modernizes the America of old.

 

 

Hotel Hugo

by DesignandContract.com [ view source ]

Progettato da Marcello Pozzi, l’Hotel Hugo di New York ospita 122 camere, incluse due top suite ai piani più alti e un cocktail lounge con vista panoramica. Gli interni della struttura ricettiva nascono dalla contrapposizione tra elementi di matrice industriale – come il cemento a vista – e finiture sofisticate dal carattere contemporaneo, come pannelli di noce italiano e infissi cromati.

Piccoli giardini sono posizionati in tutto il piano terra dell’hotel, contribuendo a dare l’impressione di un rifugio urbano confortevole e rilassante.

Il progettista ha commissionato agli artigiani dell’azienda Tedeschi l’arredo degli spazi comuni – tra cui il ristorante – e delle camere, con arredi in noce realizzati in modo sartoriale.

 

 

The Barn Reborn: Mark Zeff’s House in East Hampton

by Jane Margolies view source & more photos ]

He’s done hotels, restaurants, and stores all over the world, not to mention a New York apartment for Hilary Swank. But getting a personal toehold in East Hampton? That initially proved a challenge for Mark Zeff and his wife, Kristen. First, the perfect waterside cottage slipped through their fingers. Then the couple found a place right on the sliver of bay beach where they were married, but there were complications in trying to close the deal. While the longed-for weekend house continued to elude them, furnishings for it languished in a warehouse. The solution turned out to be: Abandon the house search, buy a secluded plot of land a two-minute walk from the little beach, and build from scratch. “It was basically design a place around the things we had collected,” Zeff says.

He took inspiration from the area’s ever dwindling farm buildings, which he admires for their simple forms and straightforward construction. But the Black Barn, as he and his wife call it, is a decidedly polished take on the vernacular. A gravel driveway leads to a pair of single-story pitched-roof structures, the first a garage and the second what appears to be a small house. Both are painted black—not an altogether surprising choice for Zeff, who makes ample use of black and charcoal gray at his firm, Markzeff, but certainly unusual for an exterior in the Hamptons, where white and weathered cedar predominate.

The real surprise is the fact that the small black “house” is not quite so modest. It actually serves as the front of a much larger, white-painted farmhouse-style structure for an interior totaling 6,200 square feet. After you step through the sober recessed entry, a skylit gallery opens up dramatically before you—certainly no East Hampton farm building ever had a hallway 12 feet wide and 68 long. Sight lines extend past a flight of stairs, clear to the back of the house. “It’s a complete waste of space,” Zeff admits cheerfully. “But it’s also very much the center of the house—a break in the floor plan and a mental break as well.”

To the left of the hall are generous public spaces. In the living room, which occupies the barn-style front of the house, the cathedral ceiling’s white-painted joists are crisply graphic in contrast to a feature wall in pine planks rubbed with black paint for a softly textured effect. The opposite wall, more accurately a screen in ribbed glass, divides the living room from the eat-in kitchen. To the right of the hall are cosier, private spaces: the library stacked with National Geographics and bedrooms for guests and Zeff’s two school-age daughters. Stretching across the very back of the house, like a porch, are dining and sitting areas. Intimate spaces, he feels, are especially important with an overall open plan. “I made the mistake, in a previous house, of having everything in one space,” he says. “You need places for people to congregate—and to escape.”

Flooring on the ground level is poured concrete, cool underfoot. It’s sealed with polyurethane, for a soft sheen, and wonderfully mottled beneath. “The way they slushed the concrete in, that’s the way the stuff dried,” he says. The imperfect patches and seams add patina to new construction. As do furnishings that, as is typical for him, are literally all over the map. There are Tuareg rugs from Morocco, ebony chairs from Sri Lanka, and a farm table from his native South Africa. Light fix-tures look agricultural or industrial. Vintage sporting equipment—wooden oars and water skis, a burnt-orange surfboard—reinforce the connection to the water.

Injections of vivid color, notably burnt orange and hot pink, ramp up the energy level. Take the rug in the living room. “We were flipping through this stack of overdyed Indian rugs,” he recalls of a shopping expedition with his wife. “When we came across the pink one, I said, ‘That’s perfect!’ Kristen looked at me like I was crazy.” Then she got into the spirit. She was the one who suggested the pink-upholstered bench for the master bathroom. The bench now sits outside the enormous shower—glass-fronted and open-sided, almost as good as showering outdoors.

The palette is otherwise black-and-white in the master suite, a raftered getaway that fills the entire second story rising at the rear of the house. Black-rubbed pine walls, like the one in the living room, bookend the 1,400-square-foot space. The bed sits on silky black cowhides that have been tossed on the floor, where they resemble a giant puddle.

For all the indulgences, the house took just seven months to construct and, on a square-foot basis, cost less than half of what’s typical in these parts. The success has the Zeffs itching to get a new business under way. They’d call it Black Barn, and it would provide similar houses for others who hanker for something less showy than what’s often on offer.

In the meantime, the family enjoys the original Black Barn. The stereo plays David Bowie, Zeff’s musical hero, and soul artists from the 1970’s. His daughters cool off in the pool, watched over by a steel sculpture modeled on a fishing fly. Locally caught bass is barbecued on the grill in the courtyard, bordered by a bed of juniper bushes and a low concrete wall topped by ivy just beginning to spill over the sides. On Father’s Day, everyone strolled down to the little beach.

 

 

Hugo Hotel: a boutique hotel in Hudson Square, SoHo New York City

by Matteo De Bartolomeis/ArchiJuice [ view source ]

The Hugo is a boutique hotel which opened last February in New York, in centrally-located Hudson Square, round the corner from Soho and the West Village, now a signature cultural destination.

The hotel has been designed by Marcello Pozzi, Italian-born and with a career spanning Busto Arsizio [in Lombardy] to Beverly Hills, and features 122 rooms and two suites, plus conference facilities, a fitness area, an Italian restaurant and a spectacular top-floor lounge with a 360° view over the city.

Pozzi was inspired by the XXth century architecture of avant-garde New York, a magnet for artists and global travelers, and the Hugo aspires to a front-rank spot among the New York hospitality icons, thanks to its high-end yet low-key approach.

The architectural contrast between original, industrial-era features, such as bare concrete and the color of window fixtures, and the sophisticated, elegant interior details, create an atmosphere of affluent, exclusive practicality.

The entrance hall leads to the main lobby and features a marble floor and navy travertine walls. As you make your way inside, the Hugo’s ‘metro urban’ nature gently starts to bite: there are powerful green elements everywhere, especially behind the reception desk, where their impact is highly aggressive.

High ceilings, wide open spaces and curved walnut-paneled walls alternate with concrete, while Pozzi-designed small leather sofas follow the pattern of the lobby’s horizontal lines.

The Hugo’s vertical vegetation (over 3,000 plants) is alive. It’s been created by G SKY using a brilliant, patented, advanced irrigation system.

The sash windows are the connection between new deal- Soho and the future.

For the bespoke furniture Marcello Pozzi has chosen a sophisticated Italian craftsman: the Tedeschi company, with an office in New York and a remarkable honors list, including work for all the world’s top hotel chains.

For the Hugo Hotel, Tedeschi has produced all of the lobby’s walnut wood structures, all the rooms and suites, the Pozzi-designed sofas and above all – a real gem – the restaurant’s benches, horizontal polished walnut planks which lend the ambience the unforgettable feeling of an early XXth century railway station waiting-room.

The lighting design project has been curated by the Lighting Design Studio principal, John Decker, while the lighting fixtures are by Visual Comfort, except for the floor lamps which are by Restoration Hardware, the well-known US contractor that has also supplied the Egg Chair located in the central lobby.

Texan designer Sutherland has provided the creative, white cement coffee-tables in the lobby.

The layered coffee-tables come from ISF’s Stack collection, designed by Pozzi.

The Hugo Hotel is a treasure chest awaiting discovery, a design project which incorporates and modernizes the America of old.

 

 

What’s Hot: Eye-Catching Restaurants Coast to Coast

by Samantha Brooks/Robb Report [ view source ]

Cipriani Downtown
Miami
Overseen by the fourth generation of Cipriani brothers—whose Harry’s Bar in Venice, Italy, has been an institution since 1931—the new Cipriani Downtown opened in Miami in May. Situated at the base of the Icon Brickell towers, the restaurant is an 8,000-square-foot, two-level venue offering seating both indoors and outdoors along the waterfront. The interiors, designed by the famed Italian designer Michele Bonan, feature a bar with the same layout as the one at Harry’s, white linen tablecloths, walnut trimming, chrome portholes, and millwork and furnishings by Tedeschi. 786.329.4090, www.cipriani.com

 

 

Lonny Magazine August

See pages 72 thru 75

[ view source ]

 

Redesign for Garden City Hotel

BY MAURA MCDERMOTT [ view source ]

The landmark Garden City Hotel will get a new look and a new full-service spa in 2014, and it will remain open throughout its gradual renovation, its soon-ta-be owner said yesterday.

The opulent hotel’s new design will be marked by “simplicity and elegance,” said Morris Moinian of Fortuna Realty Group of Manhattan,  who leads the group acquiring the 280-room, nine-story property from the Nelkin family.

The guest rooms and lobby  will be remade, but the ballroom is already in “impeccable shape,” he said. The aim is to compete with “the InterContinentals, Four Seasons or Ritz-Carltons of the world,” Moinian said.

Marcello Pozzi of MLLO Design  in Los Angeles. who was I designer and architect for Mr. C Hotel in Beverly Hills, will redesign and renovate the hotel, along with furniture- maker Tedeschi USA, an Italian firm with offices in Manhattan, Moinian said.

The work will proceed  floor by floor so there will be no disruption to guests, he said. The overhaul is expected to take about 10 months.

It can be complicated to  keep a hotel running during a renovation, but most choose to do so, said Steve Rushmore, president of HVS, hotel consultants in Mineola: “This way you keep your employees employed and the hotel operating.”

Rushmore said when he visited  the hotel about five to eight years ago, the guest rooms sported heavy draperies and bedspreads and a 1970’s or ’80s look.

“They certainly needed a  sprucing up,” he said.  Even so, he said it remains “an icon for Long Island.” Some rooms were partially renovated six years ago, Moinian said.

The property will keep its  name, despite earlier speculation that it might take on the “flag” of a hotel chain, Moinian said. “We have grown to learn that the name Garden City Hotel has a tremendous following,” he said.

Moinian said his group is  in contract to buy the hotel and he expects to close within four to five weeks. The purchase price hasn’t been disclosed.

The luxurious hotel’s  guests have included presidents, foreign heads of state and world-famous entertainers.

The original building debuted  in 1874. It was rebuilt twice by renowned architect Stanford White, and the Nelkin family did a renovation of their own. A hot spot during the Roari ng ’20s, it was Charles Lindbergh’s hotel of choice the night before his trans-Atlantic flight in 1927.

 

 

45 East 74th Street #House
Upper East Side, New York, NY 10021

New York Times Real Estate – Wednesday, May 02, 2012 [ view source ]

Valerio Morabito’s 45 East 74th is a representative of architectural craftsmanship and design that pays homage to the sense of style and elegance characteristic of the historic Upper East Side.

Born in Rome, Mr. Morabito is a prolific art collector with extensive design experience who has been deeply involved in every aspect of the thoughtful and sophisticated renovation of this historic mansion. In a style reminiscent of Renaissance architecture, the home draws inspiration from classic Italian icons, perfectly integrated with warm and rich contemporary interior design. Mr. Morabito’s attention to quality is extremely rare in this era – from hand-crafted bronze and leather banisters, Italian marble facade imported from Italy, and honed mill work panels, to the precisely-refined coffered ceilings. The home is built to last for generations.

The townhouse, perfectly positioned on a prime residential block between Park and Madison Avenues, is nestled in the heart of Manhattan’s historic Gold Coast. Originally constructed in 1879, a century later, this spectacular home has been dramatically reinvented and technologically transformed into one of the most beautiful residences in the Upper East Side Historic District.

The building’s hand-carved Italian limestone façade unites undeniably luxurious meticulously designed interiors with breathtaking outdoor spaces. While the façade and portico are classic neo-Roman – ornamental Doric columns and pediments cut from solid blocks of cream-colored limestone – the interiors are incredibly modern and no less stunning. Grand and distinct, the interiors feature a bisazza mosaic tile-lined swimming pool and spa, wine cellar, state-of-the-art kitchen, ten-foot ceilings, and a striking amount of space for entertaining guests – all bathed in an abundance of natural light. Wood-burning fireplaces and rich, cerused oak floors finish the warm the interiors. Crestron’s top-of-the-line centralized home technology gives residents full control of lighting, climate, audio, and entertainment at the touch of a button. The full-floor master bedroom suite embraces its own library, dressing room and private terrace. Corner to cornice, 45 East 74th effortlessly combines comfort with elegance.

The residence’s outdoor space is plentiful and pleasant. Front and back, the property is beautifully landscaped and is a perfect setting for garden parties and alfresco dining amidst the City’s changing seasons. The back garden is connected to the kitchen by a delicate winding staircase, making outdoor dining a proverbial breeze. Four open-air terraces reveal distinctive views of the chic Upper East Side, while the penthouse floor’s terrace spa offers a tranquil refuge for a midnight starlit soak.

DESIGN TEAM-Alveary Architecture
SELECTED FEATURES
-Handcrafted Italian Caliza Capri limestone façade (made in Italy)
with Doric columns, limestone sills & three distinct types of pediments
-Grand staircase with railing and balustrade carved from solid limestone
-Caliza Capri limestone-clad entry hall (made in Italy)
-Elevator
-Roof and four terraces with sealed Brazilian Ipe hardwood decking
-Private garden accessible from kitchen and family room
-Wood-burning fireplaces in the media room, dining room, and master bedroom
-Nespa Spas (made in California) hot tub with Bisazza Mosaico (made in Italy) glass tile finishing
-Wine cellar with honed travertine stone floors and oak interiors (made in Italy)
-Hand-crafted millwork panel walls of oak hardwood (made in Italy)
-Cerused plank flooring (made in Italy)
-Crestron home-centralized AV distribution, lighting, HVAC and security systems
-Swimming pool clad in Bisazza Mosaico glass tile finishing with a waterwall illuminated by skylight
-Pool room with Navona Travertine slab walls and floors
-Spa, fitness area and steam sauna
-Travertine slab–clad bathroom interiors
-Calacatta marble walls and floors in master bathroom
-Dumbwaiter elevator for easy transport from kitchen to two levels
-Available fully furnished.

 

Cipriani Downtown opens Friday on Miami’s Brickell Avenue

By Ina Paiva Cordle [ view source ]

Step through the revolving door into an elegant, high-ceilinged space decorated with walnut paneling, floor-to-ceiling windows and tables with white leather chairs trimmed in blue velvet, all set against sweeping views of Biscayne Bay.

The venerable Cipriani opens on Miami’s Brickell Avenue at noon on Friday, the group’s first U.S. restaurant outside New York and Los Angeles.

One year in the making, Cipriani Downtown, at 465 Brickell Ave. in the Icon Brickell, is a project of brothers Maggio and Ignazio Cipriani, fourth generation family members whose great grandfather Giuseppe opened the famed Harry’s Bar in Venice in 1931.

“We’re thrilled, we’re excited,” said Maggio Cipriani, 23, whose brother is 25. “We love the space and we love the outcome.”

The family chose Miami as the ideal spot for its 20th restaurant, he said, adding to a roster of upscale locations that includes London, Hong Kong, Istanbul, Monte Carlo, Abu Dhabi and Ibiza.

“Miami is definitely a growing market, and our international clientele, a lot of them come through here on a monthly basis,” said Cipriani, who lives in New York, but who will be here for three weeks and then plans to start splitting his time between New York and Miami. “We thought there was no better time to open here.”

Open from noon to midnight, for lunch and dinner, seven days a week, Cipriani Downtown hopes to be the spot for everything from power lunches and expense account dinners to romantic tête-à-têtes and special occasion celebrations. The restaurant can close off part of the space for private groups and events.

“We decided on Brickell because I believe it’s less seasonal than South Beach and you can work through lunch and dinner,” Cipriani said.

Restaurant consultant Dean Haskell said the choice of Miami’s financial district make sense for its core clientele.

“Harry’s Bar and Cipriani are a well known, longstanding brand worldwide, and Miami is an international capital for finance for the Latin American market as well as Europeans doing business in Latin America,” said Haskell, founding partner of National Retail Concept Partners in Franklin, Tenn. “So Cipriani would be a natural meeting place for members from both continents, as a known meeting ground.”

Designed by Florentine architect Michele Bonan, — who was also responsible for Cipriani restaurants in Abu Dhabi, Monte Carlo, London and Ibiza as well as Casa Tua in Miami Beach — Cipriani Downtown features two levels, with a total of 400 seats. The main level has 22-foot ceilings, adorned with two show-stopping Murano glass chandeliers. The space is divided into two rooms that accommodate about 180 seats and can be separated by a floor-to-ceiling partition.

A lower level is still under construction, is slated to open within two months. It will offer an outside patio that can be enclosed with retractable doors; plans also call for an outdoor grill and pizza oven.

The overall space, which encompasses 12,000 square feet including the kitchen, previously was vacant.

It has been transformed into a chic Italian salon with a waterfront theme. Elements from other Cipriani locations have been incorporated into the restaurant, such as the positioning of the bar, which mirrors the layout at Harry’s Bar in Venice, as well as millwork and furnishings by Tedeschi. The floors are grey-and-cream “Venetian” terrazzo, with walls covered in walnut, accented with polished steel and framed by floor-to-ceiling windows looking out on the bay. A bookcase with Rizzoli art books covers part of one wall. White linen napkins carrying the blue Cipriani logo and white linen table clothes adorn the three-legged tables, accented with white leather chairs or blue velvet banquettes.

Like other Cipriani restaurants, the Miami outpost serves the iconic Bellini, which dates back to 1948 at Harry’s Bar. It’s made of puree of white peaches and Cipriani Prosecco Wine, and costs an immodest $17. Other cocktails and glasses of wine are mostly $13, with a glass of Cipriani Prosecco, $11, glasses of champagne $18 to 23, and beers $7.

As part of its menu, the restaurant will feature sashimi options for lunch and dinner, along with signature Italian dishes including carpaccio alla Cipriani, $24; baked green tagliolini with Praga ham, $23; risotto “alla primavera,” $27; and vanilla meringue, $14.

“We try not to vary too much and stick to what we know,” Cipriani said.

The restaurant’s egg pasta is made in the company’s own factory in Italy, and other Italian delicacies will be flown in as well, such as fresh burrata, mozzarella and parmesan cheeses and prosciutto. Even the staff has been imported, including chefs, managers and wait staff who work at Cipriani restaurants in Italy, New York and Ibiza.

For now, Cipriani Downtown’s menu is the same for lunch and dinner, but will change daily, said Stefania Girombelli, who handles marketing and public relations.

Since its roots in Venice in 1931, the legendary Cipriani family has expanded globally. Its newest property in the United States is a hotel and restaurant in Los Angeles — Mr. C Beverly Hills.

“We have a faithful clientele that likes to go to all the locations we open,” Girombelli said. “Hopefully we will attract a lot of new people here, too, and be part of the Brickell community.”

In fact, drawing local customers will be key to sustaining a high level of success, said restaurant consultant Dennis Lombardi.

“Its reputation proceeds it, and it will get a lot of notoriety and a lot of visibility, and hence a lot of trial pretty quickly,” said Lombardi, executive vice president of foodservice strategies for WD Partners, based in Columbus, Ohio. “But a lot of it depends on it being perceived as chic and the place to be after you’ve been there once — to differentiate success from wild success.”

 

A Rebirth for Garden City

wallstreetjournal